Hole-Less Hydraulic – How Does It Work?

The Hydraulic Holeless Passenger Elevator is popular for public buildings up to 5 levels. This elevator requires just a 4 ft deep pit. It is not necessary to sing the hydraulic jacks into the ground. They are positioned above the pit floor and entirely in the hoistway.

The cab is lifted by 2 hydraulic jacks, one on each side, working in sync. The hydraulic jacks are powered by a pump unit in a nearby equipment room. The jacks attach near the top of the cab. In this configuration, the elevator can be lifted 1 level with a single stage jack as shown. A 2-stage or 3-stage jack will allow the cab to lift to additional levels.

Chained Traction Drive – How Does It Work?

The chain traction drive is very common in home elevators. An electric motor and gearbox are used to move the chain to lift and lower the elevator car. Counterweights are used to offset the weight of the cab and load, allowing the system to work more efficiently.

The motor and gearbox is located at the top of the rail system. The drums are attached to an axle driven by the gearbox. The cables are attached to the cab. As the drums wind the cables, the cab moves upward. As the drums spool out the cable, the cab moves downward

The winding drum systems do not require a machine room as the motor/gearbox is located inside the hoistway This space savings is a benefit in home design. The winding drum units also run quieter than other home elevator drives.

Screw Drive – How Does It Work?

A screw drive is use in many commercial and residential wheelchair lifts. This utilizes a long screw shaft and drive nut to raise and lower the platform. The speed of the screw drive wheelchair lift is fairly slow, so it is typically used in applications with 6 feet or less vertical travel.

An electric motor resides between the rails. It is connected to the screw shaft by belts. The drive nut is attached to the platform. As the screw shaft rotates, the drive nut (and platform) are moved up or down along the shaft. A shallow pit or ramp is required for this wheelchair lift.

The screw drive wheelchair lift is considered machine-room-less; The controller and motor unit are located in the hoistway, eliminating the need for a separate machine room closet.

Roped Hydraulic Residential – How Does It Work?

Residential elevators often use a “roped hydraulic drive” for lifting and lowering. Roped hydraulic elevators use a combination of a hydraulic jack and cables to lift the elevator car. This provides the smooth ride of a hydraulic elevator without the need to dig a deep hole in the ground.

The hydraulic jack resides in the hoistway between the rails. A pulley is attached to the top of the jack. Two hoisting cables tie things together. One end is attached to the cab. The other end is tied to a fixed point at the base of the rails. The controller and hydraulic pump reside in a nearby machine room. This elevator needs a shallow pit.

The roped hydraulic system uses the pulley to give it a 2:1 movement ratio. For every 1 foot that the jack moves, the cab moves 2 feet. This is how the unit can operate without digging a deep hole for the hydraulic jack.

Chained Hydraulic – How Does It Work?

The chained hydraulic drive is use in many commercial and residential wheelchair lifts. Chained hydraulic lifts use a combination of a hydraulic jack and chains to lift and lower the platform. The speed of the chained hydraulic wheelchair lift is substantially faster than the screw-drive lift, so it is a popular choice for applications with more than 6 ft of travel.

The hydraulic jack resides in the hoistway between the rails. Two pulleys are attached to the top of the jack. Two chains tie together the system. One end is attached to the platform. The other end is tied to a fixed point at the base of the rails. The controller and hydraulic pump reside in between the rails as well. This lift needs a shallow pit or short ramp.

The chained hydraulic system uses the pulleys to give it a 2:1 movement ratio. For every 1 foot that the jack moves, the platform moves 2 feet. This is how the unit can operate without digging a deep hole for the hydraulic jack.

The chained hydraulic wheelchair lift is considered machine-room-less; The controller and pump unit are located in the hoistway, eliminating the need for a separate machine room closet.

Roped Hydraulic LULA – How Does It Work?

The LULA elevator is a specialty lift adding accessibility to public buildings with 2 to 3 levels. LULA stands for Limited Use Limited Application. The most common drive for the LULA is “roped hydraulic”. The roped hydraulic system allows the LULA to work with a very shallow pit.

The hydraulic jack resides in the hoistway between the rails. A pulley is attached to the top of the jack. Two hoisting cables tie things together. One end is attached to the cab. The other end is tied to a fixed point at the base of the rails. The controller and hydraulic pump reside in a nearby machine room. This elevator needs a shallow pit.

The roped hydraulic system uses the pulley to give it a 2:1 movement ratio. For every 1 foot that the jack moves, the cab moves 2 feet. This is how the unit can operate without digging a deep hole for the hydraulic jack.

Chained Winding Drum Below – How Does It Work?

The Winding Drum drive is popular for home elevators. The motor/gearbox is typically located at the top of the rail system, but it can also be located on a lower level, between the rails. This allows easier access to the motor, and a reduction in required ceiling height on the upper landing.

The drums and motor and gearbox reside between the rails, typically at the lowest level. The hoisting cables are secured to the cab and travel over pulleys and down to the drums. As the drums wind the cables, the cab moves upward. As the drums spool out the cable, the cab moves downward

The winding drum systems do not require a machine room as the motor/gearbox is located inside the hoistway. This space savings is a benefit in home design. The winding drum units also run quieter than other home elevator drives.

Cable Winding Drum – How Does It Work?

A popular drive for residential elevators is the Winding Drum. An electric motor and gearbox are used to wind cables and lift and lower the elevator car. This is becoming increasingly popular as the motor control has improved. Today’s motor drives are capable of controlled acceleration and deceleration, providing very smooth starts and stops.

The motor and gearbox is often located at the top of the rail system. The drums are attached to an axle driven by the gearbox. The cables are attached to the cab. As the drums wind the cables, the cab moves upward. As the drums spool out the cable, the cab moves downward

The winding drum systems do not require a machine room as the motor/gearbox is located inside the hoistway This space savings is a benefit in home design. The winding drum units also run quieter than other home elevator drives.

Cable-Driven Glass Elevator – How Does It Work?

The Visi cable-driven elevators are self-standing, complete with integrated hoistway. The cab travels within the clear hoistway…raised and lowered by 2 hoisting cables.

Hidden inside the top of the hoistway, we’ll find the motor… the drums… and the gearbox. These devices wind up the cable to raise the cab, and spool out the cable to lower the elevator.

This elevator has many safeties built in, making it 100% compliant with national elevator code. Brakes are built into the ceiling of the cab. If the cables were to go slack for any reason, the brakes would instantly engage and stop the elevator.

The motor control is very smooth and quiet, providing an excellent ride. You will enjoy 360 degree views while smoothly traveling between levels in your home.